Saturday, July 6, 2013

Does the FBI want your Minnesota DL or ID picture?


I have been reading about efforts of the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) to find out about the FBI's initiative to have agreements and understandings with states to where states share photographs from their own photo databases.  You know that photo that was taken when you got your Minnesota drivers license or when you applied for your Minnesota ID, well it's digitally ready for facial recognition.  And the FBI wants it for their Next Generation Identification (NGI) Facial Recognition Program, without your consent.

EFF has gotten through public record requests and the Courts information about NGI and it efforts across the county.  Two such documents that EFF have received are memorandums of agreement with the states of Hawaii and Maryland with the FBI being their partner.

FOX9 did a story or two how the Minnesota Department of Public Safety (DPS) is using facial recognition to catch fraud with drivers license.  DPS got millions of Federal dollars to make all of our photos in their DL databases "facially recognizable" ready.

Well I wanted to find out if the Minnesota Department of Public Safety is in discussion with or making contact with the FBI on the Next Generation Identification and want to vacuum all our "photos".  So I did a data practices request and this is their response:

July 5, 2013

Rich Neumeister

RE: Data Practices Request in regards to sharing Minnesota DL/ID photos with the
FBI

Dear Mr. Neumeister:

Thank you for your data request regarding the above referenced matter. In it you
request all government data that the Department of Public Safety may have with
the Federal Bureau of Investigation in doing a Memorandum of Understanding
(MOU) with the FBI in sharing and giving access to Minnesota driver's license and ID
photos.
I have spoken with representatives of the Driver and Vehicle Services Division and
the Department does not have any such Memorandum of Understanding.
Consequently, there is no data responsive to your request. Again, thank you for
your email, and should you care to discuss it further, please contact me.

Sincerely,

E. Joseph Newton

General Counsel






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